SERVICES OFFERED:

 

CULVERT AND DRAINAGE STRUCTURE CLEANING AND RESTORATION

We offer Hydro-Mechanical cleaning using water and a rotating brush to restore the drainage capacity of the reinforced concrete culverts (RCC or RCP) and corrugated metal culverts (CMP or CSP). This technique for cleaning culverts is often preferred over hydro jetting.

Cleaning out a severely blocked culvert Hydro-Mechanical cleaning Final cleaning "Cattle pass under a busy highway"
Cleaned, joints sealed, rip rap installed, end sections tied. Completely rehabilitated without
any inconvenience to the traveling public.

 

CULVERT SLIPLINING USING HDPE PIPE INCREASING FLOW ON MOST EXISTING STRUCTURES

Slip-lining of culverts using Culvert Renews patented thread design is made easy for professional and novice culvert maintenance workers. Subsurface, Inc offers this culvert liner directly to the end user and we provide training for the contractor, state or county that wishes to purchase these culvert liners directly and install them themselves. Download Culvert sizing/flow chart

Corrosion is common in CMP culverts, this one will wash out and the entire road will collapse if not taken care of soon. Slip lining an existing culvert is becoming quite common. This trenchless solution to open cutting a highway, allows traffic to continue uninterrupted. We use a dual walled culvert liner whenever possible to add strength. Once lined, the void between the host culvert and the new HDPE liner must be filled. A bulk head is built to contain the grout used to fill the void between the old culvert and the new culvert. This liner was installed by others who did not understand the value and timeliness of bulk heads and grouting of the annular space after installation!

 

RCP JOINT REPAIR AND PIPE REHABILITATION

Separated joints are the dominant problem of Reinforced Concrete Pipe (RCP). Over time, the joints that couple one section of culvert to the next begin to separate. The causes of the joint separations range from vibration of the road traffic, to the pulling on the culvert from the surrounding soils through freeze-thaw cycles, to poor installation from the day the culvert was installed or a combination of all of the above. The separated joints allow infiltration of surrounding soils, creating voids next to the culvert pipe and under the roadway. Left unattended, these voids continue to grow in size and the culvert continues to separate even further until the road bed settles creating a dip or the culvert fails completely.

Although this joint appears to be tight, water is infiltrating the joint.  And what did we learn about water when it freezes? Here you can see the effects of freeze thaw a little better.  Each year, as the ice expands in the joint, the joints are pushed further and further apart. Now you can see the joint is wider and allows the ice to push harder making way for the infiltration of surrounding soils. In the advanced stages of separation, soils and water travel freely inside and outside of the culvert.  Minnesota HydInfra describes this phenomenon as "piping" Piping Water is flowing along the outside of pipe (causes loss of soil in roadbed).
Separated joints in culverts allow soils from outside the culvert to infiltrate the pipe. The soils outside of the culvert were meant to provide sub-grade support to the culvert and the sub-grade above the culvert, thereby helping to support the roadbed while allowing water to flow through the culvert and keep the hiway open in wet conditions. This is one joint of many under a busy Interstate Highway in our area. The infiltration of soil under the boot came through the separated RCP joint of this center line culvert.  Over time, as the soils surrounding the culvert infiltrate through the joints and get washed or flushed out, the voids outside the culvert grow larger, the sub grade becomes weakened and the highway begins to settle or create a dip in the road and the deterioration process worsens. This culvert was damaged at time of installation Sealing the culvert joint to prevent further infiltration of surrounding
soils and exfiltration of water under hydraulic head pressure

 

INTERNAL VOID GROUTING OF EXTERNAL VOIDS FROM INSIDE THE CULVERT

This process is performed from inside of the reinforced concrete culvert (RCP) by skilled culvert technicians, trained to work in the confined spaces of culverts as small in diameter as 24 inches. Not unlike a medical condition, these culverts need attention. The earlier a culvert joint is sealed and the voids outside the culvert are filled, the less damage there is to the roadway and the less cost to you and I, the tax payer. For too long our nation's highway infrastructure has been neglected. Out of sight, out of mind. You don't see the culverts as you drive along, but you do feel them. Every year you will see and hear about more road washouts due to culverts being left out of the maintenance picture.
See our new video animation of this process.

Trained technicians in the installation of  environmentally friendly chemical grouts under pressure. This photograph reveals that the grout filled an area under the apron, followed a void three feet in front of the apron and two feet under a portable steel coffer dam.  We are often times surprised by how big the hole under the road is! The grout seeks the areas of infiltration and replaces the voids, fissures and joint spaces with a light weight, load bearing, highly expansive chemical grout. The grout traveled nearly 10' vertically before surfacing next to the driving lane on this state highway.

The purpose of void grouting voids from inside the culvert is to prevent sinking or failure of the road bed. This is a 4' probe in a driving lane on a state highway! How big is the hole? This photo shows how large of an area is being affected By the separated joints! It's raining outside and inside this culvert.  Cracks in the pavement allow rain water to infiltrate to the soils.  Separated joints allow the water and surrounding soils to infiltrate the culvert.  Infiltration of surrounding soils leaves voids.  Voids lead to the road bed settling.

 

EXTERNAL VOID GROUTING FROM THE SURFACE

Some culverts require void grouting from the surface. When a culvert is unsafe to enter or the voids have grown too large to reach from inside the culvert, chemical grouts can be injected from the roadway above. Chemical grouts are light weight, load bearing, expandable to over 20 times their original volume, are closed cell and bond to the culvert and soils that they are injected into.

     
This photo shows the chemical grout has followed the path of infiltration
and sealed it.
     

 

WICK DRAIN INSTALLATION FOR SUBGRADE DRAINAGE

Wick Drain Installation is a highly specialized field. We know of only one company that is qualified to install wick drains under Rail Road beds and busy highways. If you are considering a Wick Drain under your Rail Road bed or highway, please call us for the referral or email the request. You only get one chance to install a Wick Drain properly.

 

POUND AND SWALLOW CULVERT REPLACEMENT

Pound and Swallow is a term used to describe how an existing culvert may be replaced by a larger steel culvert that is forced over it, effectively "swallowing" it. The existing concrete culvert or corrugated metal culvert is engulfed by a larger steel culvert that is literally pounded over the existing culvert using a large pneumatic hammer. Once the new culvert is in place, the old culvert is removed.

 

STORM SEWER AND STORM SEWER STRUCTURE CLEANING AND REPAIR

Storm sewer culverts, manholes and catch basins are often neglected. These culverts accumulate sand, gravel, street salt, trash, tree branches, lawn clippings, car parts and much more. With every deposit of obstructive material the culverts become less effective. You see water backing up in the streets where it never used to be because the culvert is not operating at its full hydraulic capacity. When water cannot enter the catch basins and get into the culverts as it was designed, additional problems begin to develop around the entry points. You see this in sunken curbs, holes and washouts around the catch basins and manholes.
You see even more erosion from the catch basins and manholes when they are not kept watertight. Separated joints, poor mortar work around pipe entry points and various cracks allow for infiltration, exfiltration, and "piping" to occur. Soils carried into the drainage system from poorly sealed culverts or catch basins leads to voids that grow larger each time the culvert or storm sewer drainage system is tested.
Using Chemical Grouts or Grout Injection to seal these points of infiltration will prevent further voids and the Chemical Grout Injection will replace soils that have been displaced.

 

DITCH CLEANING TO ORIGINAL GRADE ONCE CULVERTS ARE CLEANED TO RESTORE STORMWATER SYSTEM FUNCTION

Does it seem like there is more flooding than there used to be? We think so too! The rain that falls and the snow that melts is expected to get into the culverts faster than ever. Every time a new development is planned and built, the first consideration is drainage. How high do we have to make the sites to be able to accomplish drainage away from the new buildings, into the parking lot and into the storm culverts?
Once in the storm culvert it has to make its way to the river, lake or reservoir where all the other water is trying to get to.
Ditches, like culverts must also be maintained. Proper grading of the ditches to get the water to the culverts to get the water to the rivers and reservoirs is essential. It's all part of the system.

 

REMOVAL OF SEDIMENT FROM STORMWATER RETENTION PONDS

Where does the dirt, sand and gravel go that gets carried away in high water events? Some gets left in the culvert, some in the ditches, and most of it gets carried to the Storm Water Retention Ponds. These too, need be dredged out. Left to settle out, the ponds become more shallow and hold less water. Less storage of storm water can lead to more flooding. The higher the grade of the outlet or holding area, the less effective the culverts and ditches are.

 

RIPRAP AT THE INLET AND OUTLET ENDS OF CULVERTS

Erosion of soils around the inlet and outlet ends of culverts is a problem that must be addressed. The hydraulics of water swirling around a culvert at either end causes the soils to erode and be carried downstream and deposited in the ditches and holding ponds. RIPRAP or large rocks are a common solution to this problem. Properly sized and placed at both ends of the culvert, the rocks act as a buffer and reduce the velocity of the water so that the soils are protected and kept in place. Aprons on steel culverts or concrete culverts also provide excellent protection against erosion.

     
Riprap helps prevent erosion      

 

TEMPORARY AND PERMANENT EROSION CONTROL AROUND CULVERTS

Erosion control around the inlet and outlet ends of a culvert is essential. RIPRAP and aprons place at and around the culvert ends is only part of the effort required to protect the culvert ends and the area above and around the culverts. Proper seeding and placement of erosion control mats will help keep the soils from eroding away.

 

PRODUCTS OFFERED:

CULVERT RENEW HDPE LINER - www.culvertrenew.com

POLYURETHANE INJECTION RESINS

HYDRAULIC CEMENT

EPOXY INJECTION RESINS

EPOXY GEL ADHESIVES

EPOXY BONDING AGENTS AND BINDERS

EPOXY COATINGS

EPOXY/POLYUREA CONCRETE FLOOR AND JOINT REPAIR RESINS

AQUAPHALT PERMANENT POTHOLE PATCH - www.aquaphalt.com
   Aquaphalt

SLIKSTYX is the first and only spray-on gasket lubricant for gasketed water and sanitary pipe -
 Future Tools Inc.

 

The links below are a wealth of information on current and ongoing issues that affect the transportation industry:


www.transportationtv.orgEasy way to stay up to date on AASHTO current events.
There are lots of great videos that will serve to educate and inform quickly in most areas of transportation issues, technical, functional, political, etc
A good video primer on why cracks in concrete as well as designed in joints need to be prevented and/or sealed effectively is provided in the link below:
Transportation TV video

KWH Pipe

IVAC Sub Surface Supply

Mountain Grout

Cellular Concrete Inc



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home About Products & Services Video Contact


Subsurface, Inc. Po box 37 Moorhead, Mn 56560
Gary Strom - 701-261-9537 Brandon Strom - 701-261-9857 Fax 1-218-236-9857